International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 2000 - 2008 Edition (IA185E)

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January 2008


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International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 2000 - 2008 Edition (IA185E)

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The International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 2000 (2000 HSC Code) is a successor to the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft that was adopted in 1994. The 1994 HSC Code applies to high-speed craft that are involved in international voyages and for which the keels are laid after 1 January 1996.

 

PUBLISHED DATE: JANUARY 208
No. OF PAGES: 304 

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The 2000 HSC Code applies to craft for which the keels are laid, or which are at a similar stage of construction, on or after 1 July 2002. The application of the both HSC Codes is mandatory under chapter X of the SOLAS Convention. The new edition incorporates amendments that were adopted in 2004 and 2006. The 2004 amendments are in force and those that were adopted in 2006 will enter into force on 1 July 2008.  

CHAPTER 1 – GENERAL COMMENTS AND REQUIREMENTS

1.1 General comments

1.2 General requirements

1.3 Application

1.4 Definitions

1.5 Surveys

1.6 Approvals

1.7 Maintenance of conditions after survey

1.8 High-Speed Craft Safety Certificate

1.9 Permit to Operate High-Speed Craft

1.10 Control

1.11 Equivalents

1.12 Information to be made available

1.13 Further developments

1.14 Circulation of safety information

1.15 Review of the Code

CHAPTER 2 – BUOYANCY, STABILITY AND SUBDIVISION

Part A – General

2.1 General

2.2 Intact buoyancy and watertight and weathertight integrity

2.3 Intact stability in the displacement mode

2.4 Intact stability in the non-displacement mode

2.5 Intact stability in the transitional mode

2.6 Buoyancy and stability in the displacement mode following damage

2.7 Inclining and stability information

2.8 Loading and stability assessment

2.9 Marking and recording of the design waterline

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

2.10 General

2.11 Intact stability in the displacement mode

2.12 Intact stability in the non–displacement mode

2.13 Buoyancy and stability in the displacement mode following damage

2.14 Inclining and stability information

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

2.15 Buoyancy and stability in the displacement mode following damage

2.16 Inclining

CHAPTER 3 – STRUCTURES

3.1 General

3.2 Materials

3.3 Structural strength

3.4 Cyclic loads

3.5 Design criteria

3.6 Trials

CHAPTER 4 – ACCOMMODATION AND ESCAPE MEASURES

4.1 General

4.2 Public address and information system

4.3 Design acceleration levels

4.4 Accommodation design

4.5 Seating construction

4.6 Safety belts

4.7 Exits and means of escape

4.8 Evacuation time

4.9 Baggage, stores, shops and cargo compartments

4.10 Noise levels

4.11 Protection of the crew and passengers

CHAPTER 5 – DIRECTIONAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

5.1 General

5.2 Reliability

5.3 Demonstrations

5.4 Control position

CHAPTER 6 – ANCHORING, TOWING AND BERTHING

6.1 General

6.2 Anchoring

6.3 Towing

6.4 Berthing

CHAPTER 7 – FIRE SAFETY

7.1 General requirements

7.2 Definitions

7.3 Classification of space use

7.4 Structural fire protection

7.5 Fuel and other flammable fluid tanks and systems

7.6 Ventilation

7.7 Fire-detection and extinguishing systems

7.8 Protection of special category spaces and ro-ro spaces

7.9 Miscellaneous

7.10 Firefighter’s outfits

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

7.11 Arrangement

7.12 Ventilation

7.13 Fixed sprinkler system

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

7.14 Control stations

7.15 Cargo spaces

7.16 Fixed sprinkler system

Part D – Requirements for craft and cargo spaces intended for the carriage of dangerous goods

7.17 General

CHAPTER 8 – LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES AND ARRANGEMENTS

8.1 General and Definitions

8.2 Communications

8.3 Personal life-saving appliances

8.4 Muster list, emergency instructions

8.5 Operating instructions

8.6 Survival craft stowage

8.7 Survival craft and rescue boat embarkation and recovery arrangements

8.8 Line-throwing appliance

8.9 Operational readiness, maintenance and inspections

8.10 Survival craft and rescue boats

8.11 Helicopter pick-up areas

CHAPTER 9 – MACHINERY

9.1 General

9.2 Engine (general)

9.3 Gas turbines

9.4 Diesel engines for main propulsion and essential auxiliaries

9.5 Transmissions

9.6 Propulsion and lift devices

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

9.7 Independent means of propulsion for category B craft

9.8 Means of return to a port of refuge for category B craft

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

9.9 Essential machinery and control

CHAPTER 10 – AUXILIARY SYSTEMS

Part A – General

10.1 General

10.2 Arrangement of oil fuel, lubricating oil and other flammable oil

10.3 Bilge pumping and drainage systems

10.4 Ballast systems

10.5 Cooling systems

10.6 Engine air intake systems

10.7 Ventilation systems

10.8 Exhaust systems

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

10.9 Bilge pumping and drainage systems

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

10.10 Bilge pumping systems

CHAPTER 11 – REMOTE CONTROL, ALARM AND SAFETY SYSTEMS

11.1 Definitions

11.2 General

11.3 Emergency controls

11.4 Alarm system

11.5 Safety system

CHAPTER 12 – ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

Part A – General

12.1 General

12.2 Main source of electrical power

12.3 Emergency source of electrical power

12.4 Starting arrangements for emergency generating sets

12.5 Steering and stabilization

12.6 Precautions against shock, fire and other hazards of electrical origin

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

12.7 General

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

12.8 General

CHAPTER 13 – SHIPBORNE NAVIGATIONAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT AND VOYAGE DATA RECORDERS

13.1 General

13.2 Compasses

13.3 Speed and distance measurement

13.4 Echo-sounding device

13.5 Radar installations

13.6 Electronic positioning systems

13.7 Rate-of-turn indicator and rudder angle indicator

13.8 Nautical charts and nautical publications

13.9 Searchlight and daylight signalling lamp

13.10 Night vision equipment

13.11 Steering arrangement and propulsion indicator(s)

13.12 Automatic steering aid (automatic pilot)

13.13 Radar reflector

13.14 Sound reception system

13.15 Automatic identification system

13.16 Voyage data recorder

13.17 Approval of systems, equipment and performance standards

CHAPTER 14 – RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS

14.1 Application

14.2 Terms and definitions

14.3 Exemptions

14.4 Global Maritime Distress and Safety System Identities

14.5 Functional requirements

14.6 Radio installations

14.7 Radio equipment: general

14.8 Radio equipment: sea area A1

14.9 Radio equipment: sea areas A1 and A2

14.10 radio equipment: sea areas A1, A2 and A3

14.11 radio equipment: sea areas A1, A2, A3 and A4

14.12 Watches

14.13 Sources of energy

14.14 Performance standards

14.15 Maintenance requirements

14.16 Radio personnel

14.17 Radio records

14.18 Position-updating

CHAPTER 15 – OPERATING COMPARTMENT LAYOUT

15.1 Definitions

15.2 General

15.3 Field of vision from the operating compartment

15.4 Operating compartment

15.5 Instruments and chart table

15.6 Lighting

15.7 Windows

15.8 Communication facilities

15.9 Temperature and ventilation

15.10 Colours

15.11 Safety measures

CHAPTER 16 – STABILIZATION SYSTEMS

16.1 Definitions

16.2 General requirements

16.3 Lateral and height control systems

16.4 Demonstrations

CHAPTER17 – HANDLING, CONTROLLABILITY AND PERFORMANCE

17.1 General

17.2 Proof of compliance

17.3 Weight and centre of gravity

17.4 Effects of failures

17.5 Controllability and manoeuvrability

17.6 Change of operating surface and mode

17.7 Surface irregularities

17.8 Acceleration and deceleration

17.9 Speeds

17.10 Minimum of depth of water

17.11 Hard structure clearance

17.12 Night operation

CHAPTER 18 – OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Part A – General

18.1 Craft operational control

18.2 Craft documentation

18.3 Training and qualifications

18.4 Manning of survival craft and supervision

18.5 Emergency instructions and drills

Part B – Requirements for passenger craft

18.6 Type rating training

18.7 Emergency instructions and drills

Part C – Requirements for cargo craft

18.8 Type rating training

CHAPTER 19 – INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS

Annex 1 Form of High-Speed Craft Safety Certificate and Record of Equipment

Annex 2 Form of Permit to Operate High-Speed Craft

Annex 3 Use of probability concept

Annex 4 Procedures for failure mode and effects analysis

Annex 5 Ice accretion applicable to all types of craft

Annex 6 Stability of hydrofoil craft

Annex 7 Stability of multihull craft

Annex 8 Stability of monohull craft

Annex 9 Definitions, requirements and compliance criteria related to operational and safety performance

Annex 10 Criteria for testing and evaluation of seats

Annex 11 Open reversible liferafts

Annex 12 Factors to be considered in determining craft operating limitations

Resolution MSC.97 (73) Adoption of the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft 2000

 

 

Title: International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft, 2000 - 2008 Edition (IA185E)
Number of Pages: 304
Product Code: 4410m100
ISBN: ISBN 13: 9789280142402, ISBN 10: 9280142402
Published Date: January 2008
Weight: 0.30 kg
Author: IMO

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