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Published Date

September 2012


Also available in other formats:

Bulk Liquid Chemical Handling Guide for Plants, Terminals, Storage and Distribution Depots (BLCH Guide) (eBook)

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This publication has been developed to provide a clear, comprehensive and practical guide to all, aspects of chemical tank terminal activities, from basic design and layout to the ongoing safe and efficient operation, maintenance and management of the facility.

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The Bulk Liquid Chemical Handling Guide (BLCH) is the only publication of its kind in the world. The text and imagery within this title provide chemical, terminal and supply chain companies with valuable knowledge and insight into handling bulk liquid chemical products. BLCH follows the chapters of the CDI Terminal Inspection Report, furnishing guidance to terminal managers, employees and inspectors in addressing the management functions and technical operations of a bulk liquid chemical storage terminal. Acknowledging regional legislation and focused on Health, Safety, Environment and Security, the guide is a single international reference offering solutions and alternatives to achieve safe and efficient operational performance.

VOLUME I


1. Chemicals and their Classification 
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Regulatory Considerations
1.3 Basic Chemistry
1.4 Chemical Gases
1.5 Petrochemical Products
1.6 The Polymer Industry
1.7 Oleochemicals
1.8 Some Common Liquid Products Requiring Bulk Storage
1.9 Implications of Chemical Characteristics
1.10 Naming and Numbering Chemicals
1.11 Chemical Classification Systems
1.12 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
1.13 Special Information or Product Specific Requirements References and Further Reading

 

2. Storage Tanks and Equipment 
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Regulatory Considerations
2.3 Risk Assessment
2.4 Overview of Tank Types
2.5 Location and Layout of Tanks
2.6 General Tank Design and Construction
2.7 Pipework Systems and Pumps
2.8 Common Fittings and Fixtures
2.9 Earthing and Bonding
2.10 Gauging, Temperature Measurement and Sampling
2.11 Vapour and Emission Control
2.12 Bunds and Drains (also Referred to as Dikes)
2.13 Fire Safety
2.14 Operational Issues
2.15 Tank Cleaning
2.16 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

3. Product Transfer Equipment
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Regulatory Considerations
3.3 Risk Assessment
3.4 General Considerations
3.5 Pumps
3.6 Pipes
3.7 Valves
3.8 Hoses
3.9 Loading Arms
3.10 Couplings and Gaskets
3.11 Measuring Systems
3.12 Ancillary Equipment
3.13 Earthing and Bonding
3.14 Operational Issues
3.15 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

4. Vapour and Emission Control 
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Air Quality Management
4.3 Problems Associated with Emissions
4.4 Product Characteristics and Equipment Choice
4.5 Emissions Reduction Programmes
4.6 Sources of Emissions
4.7 Emission Monitoring and Control
4.8 Vapour Lines and Ancillary Equipment
4.9 Flame and Detonation Arresters
4.10 Blowers and Eductors
4.11 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance
4.12 Emissions from Incidents and Accidents References and Further Reading

 

5. Jetty and Shipping 
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Regulatory Considerations
5.3 Risk Assessment
5.4 Design and Construction
5.5 Jetty Infrastructure
5.6 Cargo Transfer Equipment
5.7 Waste Handling Facilities
5.8 Jetty Operations
5.9 Emergency Response
5.10 Jetty Security
5.11 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

6. Road and Rail 
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Regulatory and Terminal Considerations
6.3 Road and Rail Loading Station Risk Assessments
6.4 Loading and Unloading Infrastructure
6.5 Loading Station Product Transfer Equipment and Systems
6.6 Operations
6.7 Emergency Response
6.8 Security
6.9 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

7. Warehousing and Drumming 
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Regulatory Requirements
7.3 Risk Assessment and Management
7.4 Product Hazards and Classification
7.5 Dangerous Goods Packaging Requirements
7.6 Labelling of Drums and IBCs
7.7 Drumming
7.8 Warehouse and Infrastructure
7.9 Product Implications and Warehouse Types
7.10 Storage Arrangements
7.11 Training
7.12 Drum and IBC Filling
7.13 Warehousing Operations
7.14 Pallets
7.15 Fire Safety
7.16 Emergency Response
7.17 Security
7.18 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

8. Hazardous Area Classification
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Regulatory Considerations
8.3 Hazardous Area Classification Systems
8.4 Fire and Explosion
8.5 Product Characteristics
8.6 Hazardous Area Classification – Assessing the Risk
8.7 Documentation
8.8 Overview of ATEX Requirements
8.9 Vehicles as Mobile Sources of Ignition
8.10 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

VOLUME II

 

9. Fire Safety
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Regulatory Considerations
9.3 Classification of Fires
9.4 Terminal Fire and Explosion Hazard Areas
9.5 Fire-Related Hazards
9.6 Fire and Explosion Hazard Management (FEHM)
9.7 Fire Prevention
9.8 Fire and Flammable Vapour Detection
9.9 Fire Protection
9.10 Fire Response Strategies and Options
9.11 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

10. Buildings
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Regulatory Considerations
10.3 Building Risk Assessments
10.4 Fires
10.5 Toxic Materials
10.6 Explosions
10.7 Management of Change
10.8 Terminal Layout and Buildings
10.9 General Ventilation Issues
10.10 Emergency Response
10.11 Security
10.12 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

11. Solid and Liquid Waste 
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Regulatory Compliance
11.3 Terminal Waste Inventory
11.4 Water Management
11.5 Sewers, Drains and Bunds
11.6 Water Collection and Treatment Facilities
11.7 Cleaning
11.8 Waste
11.9 Waste Handling
11.10 Carriage and Disposal of Hazardous Waste
11.11 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

12. Electrical Equipment and Power Distribution
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Regulatory Considerations
12.3 Risk Assessment
12.4 System Drawings and Schedules
12.5 Substations and Switch Rooms
12.6 Cables and Ancillary Equipment
12.7 Motors and Ancillary Equipment
12.8 Lighting
12.9 Transportable and Portable Equipment
12.10 Alternative Energy Sources
12.11 Earthing and Static Protection
12.12 Cathodic Protection
12.13 Fire Safety
12.14 Emergency Response
12.15 Security Arrangements
12.16 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

13. Traffic Circulation and Control
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Regulatory and Terminal Considerations
13.3 Traffic Circulation Risk Assessments
13.4 Vehicle Safety
13.5 General Design Principles for Roads and Facilities
13.6 General Traffic Management
13.7 Receipts and Deliveries
13.8 Driver Requirements and Control
13.9 Emergency Response
13.10 Security
13.11 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

14. Personnel Safety 
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Factors Affecting Health and Safety
14.3 Occupational Health Controls
14.4 Personal Protective Equipment
14.5 Job Safety Analysis
14.6 Permit to Work Systems References and Further Reading

 

15. Emergency Response
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Regulatory Considerations
15.3 Assessment of Risks and Consequences
15.4 Emergency Preparedness
15.5 Emergency Response Plans (ERP)
15.6 Post Incident Cleanup and Recovery
15.7 Information and Training
15.8 Resources (Manpower/Equipment/Materials)
15.9 Security Arrangements
15.10 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

16. Security 
16.1 Introduction
16.2 Regulatory Considerations
16.3 Security Risk Assessment
16.4 Security Plan
16.5 Security Performance Standards
16.6 Security Training
16.7 Site Security
16.8 Security and the Carriage of Dangerous Goods
16.9 Pipeline Security
16.10 Jetty Security
16.11 CCTV Cameras
16.12 Computer and Document Security
16.13 Security Against Insider Activities
16.14 Security and Emergency Response
16.15 Inspection, Testing and Maintenance References and Further Reading

 

17. Management of the Terminal 
17.1 Level 1 – Policies and Procedures
17.2 Level 2 – Objectives and Management Plans
17.3 Level 3 – Operational Disciplines

CDI

The CDI is a chemical industry organization, incorporated under the law of the Netherlands as the Stichting Chemical Distribution Institute (CDI) and operates as a non-profit making foundation.

CDI is managed by a Board of Directors consisting of seven individuals nominated by the participating chemical companies. The Board of Directors establishes policy and is responsible for overall affairs of the foundation. Individual Executive Boards are elected to oversee and direct the staff managing day to day activities for the Marine, Terminals and Marine Packed Cargo Schemes.

https://www.cdi.org.uk/Introduction.aspx

Title: Bulk Liquid Chemical Handling Guide for Plants, Terminals, Storage and Distribution Depots (BLCH Guide) (eBook)
Number of Pages: 582
Product Code: WS1355EA
ISBN: ISBN 13: 978-1-85609-519-8 (9781856095198), ISBN 10: 1-85609-519-3 (1856095193)
Published Date: September 2012
Author: Chemical Distribution Institute

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