Crude Oil Washing Systems, 2000 Edition (KA617E) (eBook)

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Published Date

March 2000


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Crude Oil Washing Systems, 2000 Edition (KA617E) (eBook)

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MARPOL 73/78 requires certain ships to operate with a cargo tank cleaning system using crude oil washing. The crude oil washing installation, associated equipment and arrangements must meet requirements established by Administrations based on specifications originally adopted by the International Conference on Tanker Safety and Pollution Prevention in 1978. These specifications have been amended and modified on several occasions since 1978 and this publication contains the most up-to-date version, along with various related texts.

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This publication contains:

 

  • Revised Specifications for the design, operation and control of crude oil washing systems (resolution A.446(XI), as amended by resolutions A.497(XII) and A.897(21))
  • standard format for the Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manuals (resolution MEPC.3(XII), as amended by resolution MEPC.81(43))
  • examples of Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manuals
  • Guidelines for in-port inspection of crude oil washing procedures.

I  Revised Specifications for the design, operation and control of crude oil washing systems

 

Resolution A.446(XI), as amended by resolutions A.497(XII) and A.897(21)

Appendix I – List of changes when applying the specifications to new crude oil tankers of 20,000 tons deadweight and above

Appendix II – Training for persons intended to assume overall charge of crude oil washing

Appendix III – Agreed interpretations of certain of the provisions of the Revised Specifications

 

II  Standard format for the Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual

 

Resolution MEPC.3(XII) as amended by MEPC.81(43)

Introduction

Index of sections

Sections 1 to 18

 

III  Examples of Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manuals

 

Explanatory note

Example 1 – Conventional pipeline tanker

Example 2 – Full free-flow tanker

 

IV  Guidelines for in-port inspection of crude oil washing procedures

The International Conference on Tanker Safety and Pollution Prevention (TSPP Conference) convened by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in February 1978 adopted, inter alia, the Protocol of 1978 relating to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, which modified the 1973 Convention. MARPOL 73/78 (regulation 13 of Annex I) requires certain ships to operate with a cargo tank cleaning system using crude oil washing. The crude oil washing installation, associated equipment and arrangements must meet the requirements established by the Administration based on the Specifications for the design, operation and control of crude oil washing systems adopted by the Conference in resolution 15 and as may be revised by the Organization (regulation 13B of Annex I of MARPOL 73/78).

 

The Conference requested the Organization to review and revise the Specifications, as necessary, in order that the Revised Specifications would reflect the latest technology and practices which might be developed by the time of entry into force of MARPOL 73/78.

 

The task of reviewing and revising the Specifications was carried out by the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the Organization at its 10th and 11th sessions as a matter of urgency. In the course of its work, the MEPC found that there was a need, not only to revise certain provisions of the Specifications, but also to agree on interpretations of some of the provisions.

 

The IMO Assembly, at its 11th session (November 1979), received and examined the recommendations made by the MEPC on this matter and adopted, by resolution A.446(XI), the Revised Specifications for the design, operation and control of crude oil washing systems, together with agreed interpretations of certain of the provisions of the Revised Specifications. As stated in the resolution, the Revised Specifications supersede the Specifications contained in the annex to resolution 15 of the TSPP Conference.

 

Since the 11th session of the Assembly, the MEPC has kept the Revised Specifications under review and recommended certain amendments and additions both to the Revised Specifications and to the agreed interpretations; these were adopted by the Assembly at its 12th session (November 1981) by resolution A.497(XII), and at its 21st session (November 1999) by resolution A.897(21).

 

The attention of Governments is drawn to the fact that the Assembly urged them to establish, in time for the entry into force of MARPOL 73/78, requirements for crude oil washing installations and associated equipment and arrangements based on the Revised Specifications, and urged further that such requirements should not impose requirements over and above those laid down in the Revised Specifications.

 

Every tanker which operates with crude oil washing, in accordance with regulation 13 must be provided with an Operations and Equipment Manual approved by the Administration. The Manual must detail the system and equipment and specify operational procedures (regulation 13B of Annex I of MARPOL 73/78).

 

As the purpose of the Operations and Equipment Manual is not only to provide guidance to the crew of the ship on the proper operation of the system but also to provide information on the system and its operational procedures for inspectors going on board for inspection in ports, the MEPC decided to develop a standard format for the Manual. This was adopted by the MEPC at its 12th session by resolution MEPC.3(XII). The MEPC adopted revisions to the standard format at its 43rd session by resolution MEPC.81(43). It is hoped that the standard format will help shipowners in preparing the Manuals for their ships and Administrations in

approving them.

 

The standard format contains:

 

  • • standardized wording for the introduction of the Manual;
  • • index of the Manual;
  • • eighteen sections, detailing the information or operational instructions to be provided under each section as required by the Revised Specifications for the design, operation and control of crude oil washing systems, including the revised section 9 (resolution MEPC.81(43)).

 

Administrations may require information and operational instructions to be included in the Manual in addition to those specified in the standard format. Such information should be included in part 2 of the Manual. If no such information or operational instructions are required, the Manual will consist of one part only.

 

This publication also contains two examples of the Manual, developed by tanker owners in accordance with the standard format, for two actual tankers, one of which is a conventional pipeline tanker of about 315,000 tons deadweight and the other a full free flow tanker of about 270,000 tons deadweight. As will be seen from these two examples, the information and operational instructions under the corresponding sections vary considerably in their wording and presentation.

 

It should be noted in this connection that:

 

  • • what is standardized is the type of information to be included in the Manual under each section and not its presentation;
  • • the two examples show how the Manuals may be presented. Although some sections may be generally applicable to all ships, these are merely examples and should be treated as such.

 

The attention of Governments is drawn to the recommendation made by the MEPC, inviting them to use the standard format when approving the Manual and to ensure that, if the language of the Manual is neither English nor French, the Manual includes a translation into one of those languages.

A​​s a specialized agency of the United Nations, IMO is the global standard-setting authority for the safety, security and environmental performance of international shipping. Its main role is to create a regulatory framework for the shipping industry that is fair and effective, universally adopted and universally implemented.  

In other words, its role is to create a level playing-field so that ship operators cannot address their financial issues by simply cutting corners and compromising on safety, security and environmental performance. This approach also encourages innovation and efficiency.

Shipping is a truly international industry, and it can only operate effectively if the regulations and standards are themselves agreed, adopted and implemented on an international basis. And IMO is the forum at which this process takes place.

Title: Crude Oil Washing Systems, 2000 Edition (KA617E) (eBook)
Number of Pages: 80
Product Code: MM1245EA
ISBN: ISBN 13: 9789280150940, ISBN 10: 9280150944
Published Date: March 2000
Author: IMO

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